Supported Independent Living – Position Paper

QAI has released a Position Paper on Supported Independent Living (SIL) arrangements. The below Position Statement is an extract from the paper.

 

You can read the full document here.

 

Position Statement

The following position statement is based on the values, beliefs and aspirations that Australians with disability can have a good but ordinary life when they have personal power, control and are
supported to exercise their autonomy and rights as other citizens.

 

  1. Supported Independent Living (SIL) has become the mechanism for the proliferation of the archaic block funded group home. Rather than enabling a person to live ‘independently in their home’, it is in reality shared care in a congregated setting, often not of the person’s choosing but instead organised, negotiated, and created by the NDIS system and the service providers.

  2. A dearth of truthful information about the inflexibility of SIL, has reinforced the misconception that a person with high and or complex support needs must therefore enter a SIL arrangement. Most people do not have any independent unbiased information about SIL and have the mistaken belief that because they live in shared accommodation they must continue in the existing arrangements.

  3. People formerly living alone and supported for 24 hours of support, 7 days per week under the state system, are pressured by NDIA Planners as unwilling participants into SIL arrangements and costing Plans accordingly.

  4. In most instances, the avoidance of information about alternatives and benefits of accessing the NDIS with a non-SIL funded Plan, and lack of transparency regarding the over-inflation of SILS quotes is forcing more people back to the archaic model of group or shared home living.

  5. If a participant wants to share with another person and articulates a desire to share
    some supports with their chosen housemate, (ie: overnight support only, or a combination of one or two activities), each person is very possibly able to obtain a Plan that is not only going to meet their needs but also be less restrictive, more flexible should either housemate wish to relocate, and is possibly more efficient and effective.

  6. The solution to the abovementioned is to abolish Supported Independent Living (SIL) from Plans.

  7. Replace it with individualised NDIS Plans for everyone including people who wish to share accommodation and support. When and where people who choose to live together, wish to share supports they merely state that intention in their Plans.